Tuesday, March 4, 1997
Local stories in today's Enquirer
OBITUARIES and LEGAL NOTICES in Enquirer-Post Classified.

The Flood of 1997 in stories

COLOR PHOTOS AROUND THE TRISTATE

GATES CLOSE AS RIVER RISES TOWARD 64 FT.
By 1 p.m. Tuesday, the Ohio reached 62 feet on its way to an expected crest of 64 feet by Wednesday evening. Flood stage in Cincinnati is 52 feet. It will be the worst flood here since 1964.
THE REGION


RIVER STILL RISING, RESIDENTS WARNED
Cincinnati City Manager John Shirey issued a firm warning Monday to city residents who think they can ride out high waters: This is not your typical flood.
WHAT'S NEXT

UNFORGIVING WATERS CLAIM 3 OHIOANS
The icy water of Ohio Brush Creek was rising when John Edward Hetterick pulled his 1996 Oldsmobile Cutlass Ciera out of his friend's driveway on to Lawshe Road in Adams County late Saturday night.
THE VICTIMS

FLOODING TOUCHES ALMOST EVERYONE
No matter if you were knee-deep in muddy water or stuck in a Cincinnati garage because of rising water, the Ohio River dominated lives and conversations Monday across the Tristate.
MOOD OF THE TRISTATE

'DIDN'T HAVE MUCH TO BEGIN WITH'
''We didn't have much to begin with; now we don't have a thing we can call our own,'' said Hazel Godwin, whose trailer home was smashed Sunday by the rapidly rising waters of the Blue Creek.
ADAMS COUNTY, OHIO

RED CROSS GIVES, NEEDS HELP
Like the rising waters of the Ohio, the flood of calls for help has yet to crest at the downtown headquarters of the American Red Cross.
THE RELIEF

RIVERSIDE FIRMS LOSING INCOME
Ohio River flooding slowed commerce of all kinds in the Tristate Monday, sending businesses to scramble for storage space, schedule alternate transportation or close and wait for a drier day.
THE BUSINESSES

THE DRINKING WATER
While public water systems along the Ohio River have not reported any purity problems, contamination is possible in the event of a pipe break, or in buildings or wells inundated by flood water.
THE DRINKING WATER

AURORA POLICE CAN'T WORK FROM THEIR 1ST FLOOR
In the city of Aurora, water reached the first floor of the police station. Officers moved files to the second floor, and the dispatcher was temporarily relocated to the telephone company office.
NOTEBOOK

CHANGES WASHES THROUGH LIVES OF THOUSANDS
As the flood waters wash through the Tristate, they create thousands of small stories that are major, life-changing events for the people involved. Among them:
NOTEBOOK

SUGGESTIONS FOR HANDLING HIGH WATER
Evacuate. Flood waters rise quickly and can be unpredictable.
COPING TIPS

THE ROAD CLOSINGS
Kellogg Avenue between Interstate 275 and Five Mile Road
THE ROAD CLOSINGS

THOUSANDS FORCED TO ABANDON HOMES
A flood many described as the worst to hit Campbell and Kenton counties in 33 years closed riverfront businesses from Covington to Dayton on Monday. As many as 2,500 people fled their homes.
NORTHERN KENTUCKY

AS WATER EBBS, DAMAGE DESPAIRING
FALMOUTH, Ky.- Daybreak Monday brought hope and heartache to the thousands of Pendleton County residents left homeless by the flooded Licking River.
FALMOUTH, KENTUCKY

FLOODED RIVERS
Here are the rivers in Kentucky accounting for worst flood damage as of Monday:
KENTUCKY RIVERS

Monday, March 3, 1997

THOUSANDS FLEE TRISTATE RIVER TOWNS
The worst flooding in decades swamped parts of the Tristate Sunday, forcing thousands to flee as waters enveloped entire towns. Raging waters caused as many as 12 deaths in Kentucky and Ohio.
THE REGION

MORE RAIN TO PUSH OHIO HIGHER
Greater Cincinnati is bracing for its worst flooding in 33 years today, as the rain-swollen Ohio River continues to charge past its banks.
THE FORECAST

'THERE IS NO FALMOUTH'
FALMOUTH, Ky. - The muddy water of the Licking River left hundreds of people homeless Sunday in this small city described by the governor as the hardest hit in the commonwealth.
FALMOUTH, KY.

WHEN HOME IS GONE, FRIENDS ARE NEEDED
FALMOUTH, Ky. - The town, as far as you can see, is under dirty, brown water. McDonald's golden arches are just half moons. There's an IGA sign but no grocery, a Shell sign but no station.
LAURA PULFER COLUMN

UNUSUAL PATTERN BRINGS HEAVY RAIN
An unusual weather pattern at about 25,000 feet above the Louisville area directed the path of the rainstorm that devasted some Southern Ohio counties and Northern Kentucky. Cincinnati was largely spared for one simple reason: luck.
THE STORM SYSTEM

KENTUCKY DEATH TOLL HITS NINE
A second wave of massive flooding soaked rain-weary Kentuckians on Sunday. Deaths related to the weekend flooding rose to nine Sunday. Officials in Louisville and Jefferson County said Sunday that 40,000 homes and businesses had been flooded. Damage was estimated at $51 million.P
THE AFTERMATH

CLEANING, WAITING, WATCHING
BLUE CREEK, Ohio - A weekend rain of biblical proportions stunned Adams County residents. Many grieved for Jason Hall, a teen-ager drowned in the flood.
ADAMS COUNTY, OHIO

HOMELESS LOOK FOR SHELTER
BUTLER, KY. - ''When we woke up, we could see only this much,''Pat Jordan said as he formed his two thumbs and index fingers into a triangle, indicating how much of his house was still above water Sunday morning.
THE SHELTERS

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