Saturday, June 01, 2002

Zoo plantings show what will grow best




By Peg St. Clair
Enquirer contributor

        Great New Garden Plants is the name of a freshly installed exhibit at the Cincinnati Zoo and Botanical Garden. Located between the Reptile House and elephant display, it is an effort to introduce gardeners to the latest and most successful annuals, perennials, trees and shrubs.

        New colors, vigorous growth habits and disease resistance are some of the qualities of these winning plants.

GARDEN EVENTS
    • The Greater Cincinnati Daylily/Hosta Society's show is 1-8 p.m. today at Forest Fair Mall. A plant sale begins at 11 a.m.
    • The Greater Cincinnati Rose Association's annual show is today at Eastgate Mall. Roses may be entered from 7 to 11 a.m. (there are novice classes). Judging will be at 11 a.m. Consulting Rosarians from the American Rose Society will be on hand to answer rose questions at the information booth.
    • Perennial Fest will be 10 a.m.-4 p.m. at Berns Garden Center, 825 Greentree Road, Middletown. Speakers: Carol Vettese, bed preparation; Steven Stills, new and unusual perennials; George Pealer, shade gardening, and Dave Maile, extending your perennial blooming season. Information: 423-5306.
        This great source for Tristate gardeners was a collaborative effort. Dave Dyke, extension agent of commercial horticulture for Hamilton County, worked with the Cincinnati Flower Growers Association, which donated more than 10,000 plants. The Ohio State University Master Gardener Program is taking the lead to maintain the garden. Volunteer hours at the zoo will help interns fulfill program requirements.

        Th project also is being extended to the new Bell Tower Garden at the intersection of Reading Road and East Liberty Street and to 18 combination planters at the Krohn Conservatory in Eden Park.

        At the zoo, more than 50 acres are landscaped and maintained by zoo staff and volunteers. Special gardens include a Butterfly Garden, Pollinator Garden, Bird Garden, Native Wildflower Garden and Oriental Garden.

        Tours are available. Call 475-6106 to reach the horticulture department. Information about the Master Gardener program can be found at 946-8986.

        A list of some of the latest varieties of plants on display in these projects is available at gardenersnetwork.org. The names of growers where these plants can be purchased will be included in the zoo display.
        Contact Peg St. Clair by phone: 541-4680; Web site: www.gardenersnetwork.org.
       



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