Tuesday, September 30, 2003

Job fair for collegians and new grads



By Randy Tucker
The Cincinnati Enquirer

Greater Cincinnati is losing young workers faster than the Titanic went to the ocean floor.

To right the ship and encourage more young people to stay in the area, the Cincinnati Chamber of Commerce's Workforce Solutions Group is sponsoring a job fair Thursday aboard The Belle of Cincinnati riverboat, which will be docked at the Public Landing in downtown Cincinnati.

Recruiters from more than 30 of Cincinnati's leading companies, including Procter & Gamble, Cinergy and Provident Bank, will be on hand from 2 to 6 p.m. for the "Rock The Boat'' event, where they will interview college students and recent graduates, said Cynthia Walker, a consultant with the Workforce Solutions Group.

"This is just another effort to create a unique opportunity for college students and recent grads to learn more about our city and interact with employers,'' Walker said. "We wanted to address the issue of losing our young talent to other states.''

More than 7,200 people born between 1966 and 1975 left Hamilton County in the 1990s - an almost 6 percent drop. Only nine of the nation's 75 largest metro counties lost young people at higher rates.

In addition, Census figures show that Hamilton County lost more Gen Xers than any urban county in the Midwest in the 1990s.

The job fair won't be all business.

"Rock the Boat" will feature live entertainment, including a reggae band, and the first 150 to attend will receive free passes to the upcoming Tall Stacks Music Festival, Walker said.

"We wanted it be an opportunity for them to meet employers, but, at the same time, we wanted them to have some fun," she said.

Exodus of young

Census and other data show that Greater Cincinnati is losing young people at a faster rate than the national average and is not regarded as one of the best places for young people to live:

• More than 7,200 people born between 1966 and 1975 left Hamilton County in the 1990s.

• Hamilton County lost more Gen Xers than any urban county in the Midwest in the 1990s.

• Forbes magazine recently rated Cincinnati No. 30 on a list of the 40 "Best Cities for Singles." Pittsburgh was last.

---

E-mail rtucker@enquirer.com




BUSINESS HEADLINES
Fiorini quits plea deal
Financial planner guilty in tax case
Firm's office space doubling
Job fair for collegians and new grads
Tristate summary
Morning memo
What's the buzz?
Americans had more, spent more
Business digest