Thursday, October 2, 2003

Stanley Kreimer active in politics


Helped run campaigns in 1950s, '60s

By Rebecca Goodman
The Cincinnati Enquirer

[photo]
Mr. Kreimer

Stanley Earl Kreimer Sr., a sixth-generation Cincinnatian who co-managed the successful political campaigns of former Vice Mayor William Cody Kelly and former Ohio Attorney General and U.S. Sen. William Saxbe, died in his sleep Sept. 13at his home in Buckhead, Ga., a suburb of Atlanta.

Mr. Kreimer, 77, suffered from heart problems and diabetes, but the cause of his death is undetermined.

Although he moved to Atlanta in 1963, he made far-reaching contributions to Cincinnati and Ohio and still had many friends here.

"He had integrity (and) was very personable," said his friend, Bill Keating Sr. of Mount Lookout. "He had a multitude of friends."

Mr. Kreimer's efforts helped Kelly win a seat on City Council in the 1950s.

"He was just really a very, very active person in Cincinnati and participated businesswise and politically in the politics of those times," said Keating, who worked on campaigns with Mr. Kreimer.

"We did everything from getting the advertising (to) passing out literature. There wasn't any job too big or too small," Keating said.

Mr. Kreimer worked for the campaigns that got Saxbe elected state attorney general in 1957 and U.S. senator in 1968. Saxbe resigned from the Senate in 1974 to become U.S. attorney general.

Mr. Kreimer was born and grew up in Cincinnati, where his family owned and operated Kreimer and Brothers Furniture on Fourth Street downtown for generations.

It was closed in the early 1960s because no one in the family wanted to continue running it, according to his sister, Virginia Faughtof Indian Hill.

After graduating from Walnut Hills High School in 1944, Mr. Kreimer enlisted with the Army and served with the Air Corps at the end of World War II.

When he came home, he enrolled at the University of Cincinnati.

After college, he entered the insurance business, working for Lloyds of London before starting an agency, Kreimer-Zoller, first located at Hyde Park Square, then in the Cooper Building on Third Street downtown.

He later ran his own agency in Atlanta.

Mr. Kreimer was a member of the Cincinnati Country Club and Beta Theta Pi fraternity.

In addition to his sister, survivors include his wife of 52 years, Betty Kreimer; two sons, Stan Jr. and Eric, both of Buckhead; a daughter, Stephanie Garee of Bethlehem, Pa.; and nine grandchildren.

Services have been held.

Memorials: Shepherd Center, 2020 Peachtree Road NW, Atlanta, GA 30309-1402.

E-mail rgoodman@enquirer.com




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