Sunday, December 7, 2003

Ohio moments


Three in Navy were selfless at Pearl Harbor

On Dec. 7, 1941, three Ohioans aboard separate Navy battleships displayed such extraordinary courage and disregard for their own lives during the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor that they received the Medal of Honor. Each was killed in action.

• Rear Adm. Isaac Campbell Kidd, 57, of Cleveland, was senior officer aboard the USS Arizona and commander of Battleship Division 1. As the attack began, he went to the bridge and gave directions. The bridge was bombed.

• Seaman 1st Class James Richard Ward, a 20-year-old native of Springfield who enlisted in Cincinnati, served on the USS Oklahoma. An order was issued to abandon the ship, which was capsizing after being hit by torpedoes. But he remained in a turret to hold a flashlight so his shipmates could see to escape.

• Machinist's Mate 1st Class Robert R. Scott, a 26-year-old native of Massillon, served on the USS California. A torpedo hit flooded his battle station. Other sailors evacuated as the ship slowly sank, but Scott refused to leave. Instead, he continued to operate a compressor that provided air to gun crews.

E-mail rgoodman@enquirer.com or call (513) 768-8361




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