Friday, January 2, 2004

Harrison Avenue studied



By Reid Forgrave
The Cincinnati Enquirer

GREEN TWP. - As growth accelerates, leaders here want to have a plan for the community's busiest, still-developing road.

And during the next six months, a local consulting firm will do just that - study the traffic, the aesthetics and the economic potential of Harrison Avenue. Consultants will report back with suggestions for what the corridor should look like in a decade and beyond.

"Harrison Avenue is the front door of Green Township, and it's the most important economic development corridor for the township for the next 10 to 20 years," township administrator Kevin Celarek said. "We want to plan. We want something we can shoot for instead of having everything happen helter-skelter."

At the end of 2003, trustees here voted to pay the consulting firm Edwards and Kelcey up to $50,000 to look at the four busy miles of suburban strip that is Harrison Avenue in Green Township and suggest potential uses for unused or underutilized land.

The purpose: to have businesses along the corridor that are well suited for the increasing suburban wealth in the township.

Peggy Lopez, a candidate for the vacant township trustee position, is a member of the citizen committee that's working with the consulting firm on study. She said this is a crucial time for the township to make plans for the future.

"If we don't make Harrison Avenue something classy, it'll become another Colerain or Beechmont," Lopez said.

E-mail rforgrave@enquirer.com




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