Wednesday, February 25, 2004

Cold Spring no-knock law starts next month



By Cindy Schroeder
The Cincinnati Enquirer

COLD SPRING - Unwanted solicitors could soon face fines if they approach residents listed on this Campbell County city's new "no-knock" list.

Mayor Mark Stoeber said the law takes effect by mid-March.

Similar to "no-call" lists for telemarketers, a no-knock list provides door-to-door solicitors with addresses of people who don't want salespeople coming to their door. Residents in this city of 3,806 can sign up for Cold Spring's list at the city building on East Alexandria Pike. Once the law takes effect, residents also can pick up a special "no-knock" sticker for their front door or window.

Cold Spring City Council joined a growing number of communities Monday when its members voted 5 - 1 to approve a no-knock law.

The law is modeled after one in Villa Hills. Since Villa Hills' law took effect on Nov. 1, 170 people have signed up. So far, no one has been cited.

Under Cold Spring's law, offenders face a $50 fine for the first offense and a $100 fine for each subsequent offense, City Attorney Brandon Voelker said.

Some people began calling city officials to get on the list even before council approved it.

"I think the calls we've had in the past have generally been from older people who are afraid to open their door to strangers," said Cold Spring City Clerk Carole Huber.

Voelker and Cold Spring Council Member Lou Gerding suggested a no-knock law after reading about Villa Hills' legislation. That Kenton County city took the idea from Erlanger.

Northern Kentucky supporters of no-knock laws have said they're responding to residents' concerns about solicitors who drop vanloads of young adults in communities to sell magazines or cleaning solutions.

Individuals and groups who register to sell door-to-door in Cold Spring will be told about the law," Stoeber said.

Because of free-speech rights, the law cannot apply to religious groups or politicians.

Although groups such as the Boy Scouts and Girl Scouts legally cannot be exempted from "no-knock" laws, Stoeber said Cold Spring police won't react unless they first get a complaint.

E-mail cschroeder@enquirer.com




TOP STORIES
Vaccine testing short of subjects
Changes for jurors proposed
Symphony likely to raise prices
Work goes on amid turmoil

IN THE TRISTATE
Torso identified; detectives comb sites
Possible funding found for Brent Spence Bridge
Bus riders protest cuts
Thanks poured out
Mason council OKs raise
Neighbors briefs
Overture Awards finalists hit the stage on Saturday
Public safety briefs
Montessori method on display for parents
Summit brings in new team, fires architect
Man, 21, cited as teen's alcohol source

ENQUIRER COLUMNISTS
Korte: Reform ideas might not fly with council
Democratic commission candidate still unclear
Good Things Happening

LIVES REMEMBERED
Louie Cox, 69, NAACP leader
Sr. Alfreda Alexander, 91, chemistry professor

KENTUCKY STORIES
Defibrillators donated to baseball league
Residents object to new homes
Flea market puts end to smoking
'Seabiscuit' study comes to life as kids visit track
Cold Spring no-knock law starts next month
Kenton weighs tax for medics
Old nickname inspires new park's moniker
N. Kentucky news briefs