EDITORIALS FOR WEDNESDAY, MARCH 17, 2004
Demands for school results
A Cincinnati Public Schools proposed teachers' contract and an upcoming renewal levy request got shakier this week, as behind-the-scenes power struggles spilled over into the public arena. CPS is not a district in dire need, but it is a district in dire need of straight talk.

A new world leading to new knowledge
Scientists announced the discovery of a new world this week, a tiny bit of ice and rock far out beyond Pluto.

Hot air: Zapatero's 'disaster'
As soon as his Socialist Workers' Party won a controlling plurality of legislative seats in Sunday's national election in Spain, Prime Minister-elect Jose Luis Rodriguez Zapatero announced that his government would pull Spain's 1,300 troops from their coalition duty in Iraq by June 30.

OTHER OPINIONS
YOUR VOICE: CINDY HARRISON
An eyewitness to Madrid's agony
Cindy Harrison, a graduate of McNicholas High School and a Spanish major at Marshall University, is studying in Madrid. Here are excerpts from an e-mail to her family in Anderson Township on the recent events in Spain.

Letters to the editor
Letters to the editor on topics of the day.
SUNDAY'S FORUM COVER
To amend or not to amend
The current controversy over same-sex marriage is forcing Americans to confront a question that comes up rarely in our political life - when, why and how to amend the U.S. Constitution.

GUEST COLUMNIST: PAUL FINKELMAN
Why is the Constitution so hard to change?
It is not easy to amend the United States Constitution. The Constitution provides two methods. Two-thirds of the states can petition Congress to call a Constitutional Convention. The work of that convention would then have to be ratified by three-quarters of the states. This method has never been used. Alternatively, Congress can propose amendments to the states.

Failed amendment issues include flag desecration, abortion, women's rights
Since the U.S. Constitution was ratified in 1789, only 27 amendments have been made to that document, including the first 10, adopted as the Bill of Rights in 1791.

Hot Corner: Nipping at the heels of the newsmakers
Russian President Vladimir Putin is far more than a "one-hit-wonder," but we doubt that the ever-present song about him on Russian radio will ever have a sequel.

CRISIS IN THE CATHOLIC CHURCH
Survivors network: It's time to get an accounting
David Clohessy is the national director of SNAP (Survivors Network of those Abused by Priests). Clohessy said a priest molested him and his brothers as children, and that one of his brothers grew up to become a priest who is also a sexual abuser.

Voice of the Faithful: Seeking changes
Jim Muller, a physician who battled nuclear weapons, has turned his attention to the sexual abuse crisis in the Catholic Church. He is a founder and former president of Voice of the Faithful, one of several grassroots, lay organizations formed in the wake of the clergy sex abuse in the Church.

GUEST COLUMNIST - NAN FISCHER
'Voices' hope to empower laity
One response to the clergy sexual abuse crisis, which is currently erupting in the Catholic Church in Cincinnati, has been the development of a national organization called Voice of the Faithful (VOTF). Currently there are more than 30,000 members and 181 affiliates across the United States.

ENQUIRER EDITORIAL
Speak out now
So far at least 10 former students have filed suit alleging sexual abuse at the hands of former Elder High School Principal Lawrence Strittmatter.

SPECIAL FEATURES
Music Hall Moments
We asked for your favorite memory of Music Hall to help us celebrate its 125th anniversary. Here are several installments of your letters:
SOUND OFF
How to contact your congressman
E-mail and Web page links, phone numbers and addresses for Tristate representatives.