Sunday, April 4, 2004

Queen City Rewind


The week in business news in Greater Cincinnati and Northern Kentucky

HEADLINERS

Homebuilder Bill Erpenbeck will spend 30 years in federal prison after his sentencing on bank fraud and obstruction of justice charges. Erpenbeck's lawyer made one last attempt at casting his client as a whistleblower who had been unfairly vilified by the media, but it didn't work. A packed courtroom of homeowners hurt by the fraud scheme seemed satisfied with the verdict.

No fewer than 14 people from Greater Cincinnati have raised at least $100,000 for President Bush's re-election campaign. National campaign chair Mercer Reynolds is a Cincinnatian. There should no longer be any doubt that Cincinnati is a national player in financing Republican politics.

ENVIRONMENT PART I

By agreeing to spend millions of dollars on pollution control equipment, AK Steel convinced the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency to drop its 4-year dispute against the Middletown steelmaker. The move represents a major effort by the company to make peace with its neighbors.

ENVIRONMENT PART II

Greater Cincinnati already has lost at least four international companies because the region hasn't met federal clean-air standards, Greater Cincinnati Chamber of Commerce president Michael Fisher warned a congressional committee studying pollution standards.

STAYING CLOSE TO HOME

Warren County tourism officials won't contribute $400,000 to a regional tourism agency. Cincinnati and Northern Kentucky will attempt to keep the program alive, but it won't be one entity promoting the entire area.

THERE'S THAT WORD AGAIN

Treasury Secretary John Snow danced around the "outsourcing" controversy during a Cincinnati interview. He said outsourcing helps global trade, which is good for the economy. The careful wording shows how politically charged this issue has become.

QUOTE OF THE WEEK

"Local news directors have good reason to hook viewers by implying that the coming storm will end life in our town as we know it." This from Jack Williams, USA Today weather editor, on the trend of local news stations capitalizing on viewer interest in the weather to drive ratings.




BUSINESS HEADLINES
Roto-Rooter's path to success
Hospice care 'unmet need' in U.S.
Queen City Rewind
In Middletown, AK Steel striving to clear the air
More light, more work
Look Who's Talking
Care for a nice job cleaning zoo cages?
Tristate business notes
Eckberg: Job rounds: Can't beat face-to-face
Business meetings this week