Sunday, August 22, 2004

Around Northern Kentucky


That Fletcher, he's quite the jet-setter

Click here to e-mail Patrick Crowley
When Gov. Ernie Fletcher was in Chile two weeks ago on an economic development recruitment trip, he took a spin in a Chilean Air Force jet.

Fletcher, a former Air Force fighter pilot, "performed a series of aerobatics" in the plane, according to his press office. No word if he forced the evacuation of any government buildings, like he did in while attending President Reagan's funeral.

Because of a faulty tracking device, Fletcher's state-owned plane could not be identified as it flew into Washington. Fearing a terrorist attack, the Capitol was evacuated.

Maybe the folks in Washington would not have been so frightened had they seen the photos provided by the governor's office of Fletcher preparing to fly the Chilean jet.

Think Michael Dukakis in a tank, though it is kind of cool to have a governor who can pilot a fighter jet.

Speaking of terrorists

U.S. Sen. Jim Bunning was bravely lunching at the Greyhound Tavern on Monday without his bodyguards.

Bunning made news last week when he requested a police security detail during a trip to western Kentucky. Washington has warned lawmakers about the potential for terrorist attacks while they are on the road. Bunning is the only member of Congress from Kentucky to actually travel with police bodyguards that are paid by the taxpayers.

As one would expect, Democrat Dan Mongiardo, Bunning's opponent, had a field day with the issue, even tying it to Bunning's refusal to debate.

"Jim Bunning is afraid to answer the people of Kentucky by debating the issues," Mongiardo told The Associated Press. "Now it appears he is even afraid of the voters of Kentucky."

There were, of course, lots of jokes from the Dems about al-Qaida attacking Paducah and Fulton - where Bunning presented federal government checks for new firefighting equipment - and if terrorists "are lying in wait in Possum Trot," a tiny Marshall County community.

But who could blame Bunning for venturing out to eat at the Greyhound. I'd risk my life for one of their fish sandwiches, too.

Who said what?

During a recent campaign forum, state Sen. Jack Westwood, R-Crescent Springs, attributed the following quote to President Reagan:

"It's amazing what you can accomplish if you do not care who gets the credit."

But Westwood's opponent, Democrat Kathy Groob, quickly corrected him.

Reagan may have used the quote, but it originally came from President Truman.

"It's one of my favorite quotes because I truly believe it," Groob said.

Groob is so inspired by the quote she even had it taped inside the folder where she kept her notes for the forum.

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E-mail pcrowley@enquirer.com. Crowley interviews Campbell District Court Judge Gregory Popovich this week on ICN6's "On The Record", which is broadcast daily on Insight Communications Channel 6.




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