Sunday, October 31, 2004

Campaign notebook


Percentage voting may be highest since '92

The Enquirer

The secretary of state predicts about 73 percent of Ohio's 7.98 million registered voters will cast ballots Tuesday.

Ken Blackwell says he based that on information provided his office by county boards of elections.

ELECTION 2004
John Kerry
Election 2004 section
Enquirer's election guide

SUNDAY FORUM
Going back to 'college'
Our choices for Tuesday
Issue 4 is affordable way for city to improve
Issue 4 would hurt city, help taxpayers little
Bush is best choice to fight terrorists
More letters: The election of 2004

NATIONAL
Bin Laden tape fodder in presidential contest
Electoral College 'tied,' too
Contract officer warned against Halliburton deal
Cheney to woo Aloha State
Gore gets lei before VP does

OHIO
Election paranoia running rampant
Final push: Get voters excited
Rallies, caravans, calls: Voting day must be near
On the streets, door to door, citizens rally for school issues
Direct mail still potent for candidates
Remember my name!
Campaign notebook
A survival guide to voting in Ohio (PDF file, 12k)

KENTUCKY
Crowley: GOP forfeits high ground in Senate race
Voters anxious for election
Some candidates endorse Ky. importing drugs from Canada
Getting out all the votes
Lakeside Park candidates oppose possibility of merger
Parties seek gains Tuesday in Ky.'s divided legislature
Amendment won't be last word, foes say
Voters turn to Bible for ballot guidance
Senate campaign comes down to barbs over Ten Commandments

Calculations were derived from the total number of registered voters, turnout in similar elections and specific local factors, such as local races and ballot issues.

Ohio voter turnout for the general election in 2000 was 63 percent; turnout in 1996 was 68 percent; turnout in 1992 was 77 percent.

• • • 

Ohioans will use three different systems to vote Tuesday.

Sixty-eight counties will use punch-card machines. Voters use a stylus to punch a hole through paper cards, which are fed into machines that read the spaces.

Thirteen counties (including Clermont) will use optical scan machines. Voters use a pencil to mark a space next to the candidate's name, and the ballots are run through a machine that reads the marks.

Seven counties will use electronic touch-pad machines that record votes with the press of a button next to the candidate's name. Votes are tallied on computer chips stored in the machines, then read at the board of elections.

Associated Press

• • • 

FOREST, Ohio - Retired history teacher Jim Taylor knows his political campaign buttons - all 4,000 of them.

He keeps them in what his family has dubbed the "history room" of his home in this village 70 miles south of Toledo. Taylor had the room added to his house when his hobby outgrew his habitat.

Taylor, 54, is retired as an American history teacher at Riverdale High School. He now teaches part time at the University of Findlay and a local community college.

Taylor got the button bug during the 1960 campaign in which John F. Kennedy defeated Richard Nixon. The best of them have played a key role in determining an election, he said.

"The guy who gets the most terrific slogan is the one who wins. 'I like Ike,' for example. That's ingrained in all of us," Taylor said.

He's holding off a prediction for the outcome of Tuesday's election - at least by looking at the buttons.

"Not this time," he said, pointing to a display of more than 100 buttons for Sen. John Kerry and President Bush. "Sometimes they stick. Sometimes they don't."

Taylor has seen Bush and Kerry at nearby rallies this year, but his favorite was Kennedy, he said. He even has some re-election items made before Kennedy's assassination on Nov. 22, 1963, including a set of mini-California license plates: "JFK 464."

"Kennedy was very inspirational," he said. "It was just a different sort of time."

Associated Press




ELECTION 2004
Election paranoia running rampant
Final push: Get voters excited
A survival guide to voting in Ohio (PDF file, 12k)
Rallies, caravans, calls: Voting day must be near
Bin Laden tape fodder in presidential contest
Electoral College 'tied,' too
Contract officer warned against Halliburton deal
Cheney to woo Aloha State
Gore gets lei before VP does
On the streets, door to door, citizens rally for school issues
Direct mail still potent for candidates
Remember my name!
Campaign notebook
Voters anxious for election
Some candidates endorse Ky. importing drugs from Canada
Getting out all the votes
Lakeside Park candidates oppose possibility of merger
Parties seek gains Tuesday in Ky.'s divided legislature
Amendment won't be last word, foes say
Voters turn to Bible for ballot guidance
Senate campaign comes down to barbs over Ten Commandments
Election 2004 section

TOP LOCAL HEADLINES
Police seek 3 men suspected in break-in, assault
National Guard tries new ways to entice recruits
As DNA backlog clears, Ohio police get leads in 210 cases
Pregnant smokers studied
Woman shot in sister's Price Hill apt. dies
Ethical concerns focus on eye surgery
Local news briefs

KENTUCKY HEADLINES
Boone aims to keep road from slipping into river
Family that kickboxes together stays together
Property value, tax soar
Pa. firm to design bridge linking Louisville, Indiana
Private prison not fined over violations, paper says
Northern Kentucky news briefs

EDUCATION
Schools hope to keep gains while cutting staff
Staff-trimming always painful
'It's a great day at Dixie' and enrollment proves it

NEIGHBORS
It took a village to free her
Loveland rolls back property tax 1 mill
Townships, I-71 corridor may get business recruiter

LIVES REMEMBERED
Bob Patterson, former CCD English teacher
Realty firm co-founder Thomas Duffy
Mary LaVelle keeper of keys at church
Richard K. Fritsche, 84, model maker

ENQUIRER COLUMNS
Crowley: GOP forfeits high ground in Senate race
Bronson: Guide to Iraq
Catwalk's not for cats